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What initiatives focus on children affected by a parent’s cancer diagnosis?

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What initiatives focus on children affected by a parent’s cancer diagnosis?

QuestionsCategory: cancerWhat initiatives focus on children affected by a parent’s cancer diagnosis?
ishbana pariyarath asked 7 months ago

Reaction of children after hearing about cancer. 

  • Young children may not be aware of what is going on , but can sense the routine changes due to the regular hospital appointments, tests and treatment.
  • Some children may think and worry that they are the reason that you are affected with cancer. It may be something simple or misbehaved, or fallen out temporarily. They may feel guilty of things they have done.
  • If children are excluded they may think the things are worse than the reality. Childrens are  sensitive, so they feel that they are not important enough to know what is going on.
  • Children can hear about cancer in the playground or television based on their age. They may have a doubt of getting cancer too or others close to you will die. 

Children's behavior

  • Many children seem to take things in their stride but some may show changes to act and respond. 
  • Babies and toddlers may be clingy and fretful as routines are different and some things feel unsettled.
  • Pre-school and early school age children may regress a little in behavior, which can make you feel worried and guilty. They will settle by time and need reassurance and support. 
  • It is difficult for children to express their worries, so they start misbehaving by showing anger, or quiet, and cannot concentrate on schoolwork. 
  • As children get older,  they become more independent, and they worry about the impact the illness will have on their lives, and so a guilty feeling will start.
  • Teenagers will spend their time in the room or away from home.

Ways of helping the child

  • Convey them that they can talk at any time about worries. Children can ask lot of questions and some other children focussed on play, friends, TV and don't ask anything
  • Try to keep the possible routines as familiar. Prepare the children in advance for any routine changes such as  different people will pick them from school, etc. 
  • Assure them that they are always safe, loved and taken care of in future. Children will feel insecure of changes that are happening. Let children know that things will be different for a while, but the love towards them has not changed.
  • Prepare the children for any physical changes they may see through the process of treatment such as being extra tired or feeling unwell.
  • Explain that some people lose their hair during chemotherapy, or in surgery  which makes children uncomfortable for a while. Explain that they may need to be gentle for any surgical wounds, or chance to rest sometimes. 
  • Give them little jobs to do to help, but understand how they feel and like it sometimes.
  • Have a talk with children’s nursery, school or college about changes happening in the home. If the staff know, they can give extra support, or make special arrangements for any exams or coursework and understand any changes in the child’s behavior. 
  • Encourage them to spend time playing with friends. They need the chance to still be children, and it will help things feel more normal.
  • Planning treats that look forward in our daily life can feel good to be on hold through treatment. Spending some time together with children such as a trip out or a meal or a break away gives something happy to look forward to.
  • Try to have an individual time with children 
  • Providing relevant books and reading material to children to explore their questions and concerns. This method can  stimulate questions and offer reassurance. 
  • Involve in the activities of helping, organize school activities and other children routines which may needs prior plans
  • People feel tired not only with the treatment of cancer but also with regular visits to the hospital. Family and friends are usually glad to help in hospital visits so focus is to be with the personal or on family members

When a parent is undergoing cancer diagnosis children may feel emotional turmoil of different types of worries and questions in their mind. These can be resolved by proper spending time with children and making them understand the situation.

Dr. Bommu Venkateshwara Reddy Staff replied 7 months ago

<strong>Reaction of children after hearing about cancer.</strong>
Young children may not be aware of what is going on , but can sense the routine changes due to the regular hospital appointments, tests and treatment.
Some children may think and worry that they are the reason that you are affected with cancer. It may be something simple or misbehaved, or fallen out temporarily. They may feel guilty of things they have done.

If children are excluded they may think the things are worse than the reality. Childrens are sensitive, so they feel that they are not important enough to know what is going on.
Children can hear about cancer in the playground or television based on their age. They may have a doubt of getting cancer too or others close to you will die.

<strong>Children's behavior</strong>
<ul>
<li>
Many children seem to take things in their stride but some may show changes to act and respond.
Babies and toddlers may be clingy and fretful as routines are different and some things feel unsettled.
Pre-school and early school age children may regress a little in behavior, which can make you feel worried and guilty. They will settle by time and need reassurance and support.
It is difficult for children to express their worries, so they start misbehaving by showing anger, or quiet, and cannot concentrate on schoolwork.
As children get older, they become more independent, and they worry about the impact the illness will have on their lives, and so a guilty feeling will start.
Teenagers will spend their time in the room or away from home.</li>
</ul>
<strong>Ways of helping the child</strong>
<ul>
<li>
Convey them that they can talk at any time about worries. Children can ask lot of questions and some other children focussed on play, friends, TV and don't ask anything
Try to keep the possible routines as familiar. Prepare the children in advance for any routine changes such as different people will pick them from school, etc.
Assure them that they are always safe, loved and taken care of in future. Children will feel insecure of changes that are happening. Let children know that things will be different for a while, but the love towards them has not changed.
Prepare the children for any physical changes they may see through the process of treatment such as being extra tired or feeling unwell.
Explain that some people lose their hair during chemotherapy, or in surgery which makes children uncomfortable for a while. Explain that they may need to be gentle for any surgical wounds, or chance to rest sometimes.
Give them little jobs to do to help, but understand how they feel and like it sometimes.
Have a talk with children’s nursery, school or college about changes happening in the home. If the staff know, they can give extra support, or make special arrangements for any exams or coursework and understand any changes in the child’s behavior.
Encourage them to spend time playing with friends. They need the chance to still be children, and it will help things feel more normal.
Planning treats that look forward in our daily life can feel good to be on hold through treatment. Spending some time together with children such as a trip out or a meal or a break away gives something happy to look forward to.
Try to have an individual time with children
Providing relevant books and reading material to children to explore their questions and concerns. This method can stimulate questions and offer reassurance.
Involve in the activities of helping, organize school activities and other children routines which may needs prior plans
People feel tired not only with the treatment of cancer but also with regular visits to the hospital. Family and friends are usually glad to help in hospital visits so focus is to be with the personal or on family members
When a parent is undergoing cancer diagnosis children may feel emotional turmoil of different types of worries and questions in their mind. These can be resolved by proper spending time with children and making them understand the situation.</li>
</ul>

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